Skip to content
 

A randomized trial of the set-point diet

Someone pointed me to this forthcoming article in the journal Nutrition by J. F. Lee et al.

It looks pretty cool. I’m glad that someone went to the effort of performing this careful study. Regular readers will know that I’ve been waiting for this one for awhile.

In case you can’t read the article through the paywall, here’s the abstract:

Background: Under a widely-accepted theory of caloric balance, any individual has a set-point weight and will find it uncomfortable and typically unsustainable to keep his or her weight below that point. Set-points have evidently been increasing over the past few decades in the United States and other countries, leading to a public-health crisis of obesity. In an n=1 study, Roberts (2004, 2006) proposed an intervention to lower the set-point via daily consumption of unflavored sugar water or vegetable oil.

Objective: To evaluate weight-loss outcomes under the diet proposed by Roberts (2004, 2006).

Design: Randomized clinical trial with two active arms and one control arm. Daily diaries and self-measurements and monthly laboratory measurements.

Participants: 90 healthy volunteers, aged 24-64, recruited in the northeastern United States.

Results: Participants differed in outcome measurements after two weeks, one month, six months, and

P.S. Fabio Rojas got me beat.

6 Comments

  1. John Duncan says:

    I couldn’t find the article you referred to in Nutrition. (I have access behind the paywall on Science Direct). The link you gave doesn’t point directly to the article. Is it the right journal?

  2. luosha says:

    not in March, April, May or “in press” contents from the journal Nutrition.
    also couldn’t find it on google scholar.

    would you mind updating your link?

  3. JL says:

    Could you post the rest of the abstract, too.

  4. LH says:

    How bout April Fools!!

  5. Ase Innes-Ker says:

    Stinkers. All of you! (Well, you and Razib). But, you at least left a hint….

  6. FH says:

    don’t sell yourself short, FR had “help” or inspiration at least, from an Onion story.