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2013

There’s lots of overlap but I put each paper into only one category.  Also, I’ve included work that has been published in 2013 as well as work that has been completed this year and might appear in 2014 or later.  So you can can think of this list as representing roughly two years’ work.

Political science:

Survey methods:

Statistical graphics:

Bayesian methods:

Causal inference:

Statistical computing:

Ethics:

History and philosophy of statistics:

Replication and scientific publication:

Other:

I love (almost) all of this work so I hate to see various important projects buried in the middle of the list.  I just hope the different sort of papers reach their appropriate audiences.

Also, BDA3 (with John Carlin, Hal Stern, David Dunson, Aki Vehtari, and Don Rubin) and Stan (with Bob Carpenter, Matt Hoffman, Daniel Lee, Ben Goodrich, Michael Betancourt, Marcus Brubaker, Jiqiang Guo, Peter Lee, and Allen Riddell).

Thanks again to all my collaborators and discussants of all sorts (including blog commenters, and even including trolls and people who send me rude emails, as these too can stimulate useful thoughts and can reveal important gaps in communication), as well as our sponsors for their financial support of this work.

5 Comments

  1. Robert Grant says:

    Andrew,
    Firstly, congratulations – a magnificent tally.
    Secondly, I worry you are not getting enough sleep! Perhaps a project for 2014 could be relating your sleep to your outputs. Or, in the absence of informed consent, a censored exposure variable from the timestamps on your blog posts! (9 am is respectable)

  2. Jared says:

    With regard to Kropko et. al./MI for continuous and categorical data, we’ve had some luck joint modeling with NP Bayes (http://stat.duke.edu/~jsm38/preprints/hcmm.pdf). We’re able to pick up complex relationships even with a default model specification. We’re working on methods that incorporate constraints as well (structural zeros, linear constraints, semicontinuous variables, etc).

  3. One of the things we astronomers often believe about statisticians is that they only publish one paper every year or two. I guess we are wrong about that… And now I don’t feel so bad about sending all the rude emails. Here’s to 2014!

  4. Donald A. Coffin says:

    All I can say is “Wow!” If that’s a typical (2) year(s) for you, I’m more than impressed. Actually, I wonder how you find time for the blog…or to sleep…

  5. stringph says:

    I feel bad for people who are trying to get a job at the same level. “Publish or perish”, they say, well… just how much does anyone have to publish?

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