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Archive of posts filed under the Decision Theory category.

A completely reasonable-sounding statement with which I strongly disagree

In the context of a listserv discussion about replication in psychology experiments, someone wrote: The current best estimate of the effect size is somewhere in between the original study and the replication’s reported value. This conciliatory, split-the-difference statement sounds reasonable, and it might well represent good politics in the context of a war over replications—but […]

“Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?”

Greg Werbin points us to an online discussion of the following question: Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing (with all its difficult concepts and which are among the most statistical sins) for problems where there is an interval estimator (confidence, bootstrap, credibility or whatever)? What is the best explanation (if any) to be […]

What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied to statistics education

Happy new year! A few years ago, Eric Loken and I wrote, Statisticians: When we teach, we don’t practice what we preach: As statisticians, we give firm guidance in our consulting and research on the virtues of random sampling, randomized treatment assignments, valid and reliable measurements, and clear specification of the statistical procedures that will […]

On deck this month

No padding here, only the good stuff: What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied to statistics education Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing from foreign students […]

It’s not just the confidence and drive to act. It’s having engraved inner criteria to guide action.

To slightly paraphrase the words of a New York Times columnist: I once read about a guy whose childhood was a steady calamity. He was afraid, unable to control his mind and self. But he became a writer and discovered he was magnificent at it. Through the act of writing, he could investigate his fears […]

On deck this week

Mon: Statistical methods as pocket tools Tues: It’s not just the confidence and drive to act. It’s having engraved inner criteria to guide action. Wed: Your closest collaborator . . . and why you can’t talk with her Thurs: What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied […]

Trajectories of Achievement Within Race/Ethnicity: “Catching Up” in Achievement Across Time

Just in time for Christmas, here’s some good news for kids, from Pamela Davis-Kean and Justin Jager: The achievement gap has long been the focus of educational research, policy, and intervention. The authors took a new approach to examining the achievement gap by examining achievement trajectories within each racial group. To identify these trajectories they […]

Using statistics to make the world a better place?

In a recent discussion involving our frustration with crap research, Daniel Lakeland wrote: I [Lakeland] really do worry about a world in which social and institutional and similar effects keep us plugging away at a certain kind of cargo-cult science that produces lots of publishable papers and makes it easier to get funding for projects […]

On deck this week

Mon: Research benefits of feminism Tues: Using statistics to make the world a better place? Wed: Trajectories of Achievement Within Race/Ethnicity: “Catching Up” in Achievement Across Time Thurs: Common sense and statistics Fri: I’m sure that my anti-Polya attitude is completely unfair Sat: The anti-Woodstein Sun: Sometimes you’re so subtle they don’t get the joke

It’s Too Hard to Publish Criticisms and Obtain Data for Replication

Peter Swan writes: The problem you allude to in the above reference and in your other papers on ethics is a broad and serious one. I and my students have attempted to replicate a number of top articles in the major finance journals. Either they cannot be replicated due to missing data or what might […]