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Archive of posts filed under the Decision Theory category.

Research project in London and Chicago to develop and fit hierarchical models for development economics in Stan!

Rachael Meager at the London School of Economics and Dean Karlan at Northwestern University write: We are seeking a Research Assistant skilled in R programming and the production of R packages. The successful applicant will have experience creating R packages accessible on github or CRAN, and ideally will have experience working with Rstan. The main […]

Testing Seth Roberts’ appetite theory

Jonathan Tupper writes: My organization is running a group test of Seth Roberts’ old theory about appetite. We are running something like a “web trial” as discussed in your Chance article with Seth. And in fact our design was very inspired by your conversation… For one, we are using a control group which takes light […]

What’s Wrong with “Evidence-Based Medicine” and How Can We Do Better? (My talk at the University of Michigan Friday 2pm)

Tomorrow (Fri 9 Feb) 2pm at the NCRC Research Auditorium (Building 10) at the University of Michigan: What’s Wrong with “Evidence-Based Medicine” and How Can We Do Better? Andrew Gelman, Department of Statistics and Department of Political Science, Columbia University “Evidence-based medicine” sounds like a good idea, but it can run into problems when the […]

Andrew vs. the Multi-Armed Bandit

Andrew and I were talking about coding up some sequential designs for A/B testing in Stan the other week. I volunteered to do the legwork and implement some examples. The literature is very accessible these days—it can be found under the subject heading “multi-armed bandits.” There’s even a Wikipedia page on multi-armed bandits that lays […]

Postdoc opening on subgroup analysis and risk-benefit analysis at Merck pharmaceuticals research lab

Richard Baumgartner writes: We are looking for a strong postdoctoral fellow for a very interesting cutting edge project. The project requires expertise in statistical modeling and machine learning. Here is the official job ad. We are looking for candidates that are strong both analytically and computationally (excellent coding skills). In the project, we are interested […]

Big Data Needs Big Model

Big Data are messy data, available data not random samples, observational data not experiments, available data not measurements of underlying constructs of interest. To make relevant inferences from big data, we need to extrapolate from sample to population, from control to treatment group, and from measurements to latent variables. All these steps require modeling. At […]

The difference between me and you is that I’m not on fire

“Eat what you are while you’re falling apart and it opened a can of worms. The gun’s in my hand and I know it looks bad, but believe me I’m innocent.” – Mclusky While the next episode of Madam Secretary buffers on terrible hotel internet, I (the other other white meat) thought I’d pop in […]

(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Evidence, Policy, and Understanding

[link] Kevin Lewis asked me what I thought of this article by Oren Cass, “Policy-Based Evidence Making.” That title sounds wrong at first—shouldn’t it be “evidence-based policy making”?—but when you read the article you get the point, which is that Cass argues that so-called evidence-based policy isn’t so evidence-based at all, that what is considered […]

The retraction paradox: Once you retract, you implicitly have to defend all the many things you haven’t yet retracted

Mark Palko points to this news article by Beth Skwarecki on Goop, “the Gwyneth Paltrow pseudoscience empire.” Here’s Skwarecki: When Goop publishes something weird or, worse, harmful, I often find myself wondering what are they thinking? Recently, on Jimmy Kimmel, Gwyneth laughed at some of the newsletter’s weirder recommendations and said “I don’t know what […]

Alzheimer’s Mouse research on the Orient Express

Paul Alper sends along an article from Joy Victory at Health News Review, shooting down a bunch of newspaper headlines (“Extra virgin olive oil staves off Alzheimer’s, preserves memory, new study shows” from USA Today, the only marginally better “Can extra-virgin olive oil preserve memory and prevent Alzheimer’s?” from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and the better […]

Nudge nudge, say no more

Alan Finlayson puts it well when he writes of “the tiresome business of informing and persuading people replaced by psychological techniques designed to ‘nudge’ us in the right direction.” I think that’s about right. Nudging makes sense as part of a package that already includes information and persuasion. For example, tell us that smoking causes […]

I’m with Errol: On flypaper, photography, science, and storytelling

[image of a cat going after an insect] I’ve been reading this amazing book, Believing is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography, by Errol Morris, who, like John Waters, is a pathbreaking filmmaker who is also an excellent writer. I recommend this book, but what I want to talk about here is one particular […]

On deck through the first half of 2018

Here’s what we got scheduled for ya: I’m with Errol: On flypaper, photography, science, and storytelling Politically extreme yet vital to the nation healthy kids? A coding problem in the classic study, Nature and Origins of Mass Opinion A model for scientific research programmes that include both “exploratory phenomenon-driven research” and “theory-testing science” Anthony West’s […]

“Handling Multiplicity in Neuroimaging through Bayesian Lenses with Hierarchical Modeling”

Donald Williams points us to this new paper by Gang Chen, Yaqiong Xiao, Paul Taylor, Tracy Riggins, Fengji Geng, Elizabeth Redcay, and Robert Cox: In neuroimaging, the multiplicity issue may sneak into data analysis through several channels . . . One widely recognized aspect of multiplicity, multiple testing, occurs when the investigator fits a separate […]

The failure of null hypothesis significance testing when studying incremental changes, and what to do about it

A few months ago I wrote a post, “Cage match: Null-hypothesis-significance-testing meets incrementalism. Nobody comes out alive.” I soon after turned it into an article, published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, with the title given above and the following abstract: A standard mode of inference in social and behavioral science is to establish stylized […]

It’s . . . spam-tastic!

We’ll celebrate Christmas today with a scam that almost fooled me. OK, not quite: I was about two steps from getting caught. Here’s the email: Dear Dr. Gelman, I hope you do not mind me emailing you directly, I thought it would be the easiest way to make first contact. If you have time for […]

Walk a Crooked MiIe

An academic researcher writes: I was wondering if you might have any insight or thoughts about a problem that has really been bothering me. I have taken a winding way through academia, and I am seriously considering a career shift that would allow me to do work that more directly translates to societal good and […]

Yes, Virginia, it can be rational to vote!

Carl Shulman correctly thought I’d be interested in this news item, “A single vote leads to a rare tie for control of the Virginia legislature”: A Republican seat flipped Democratic in a wild recount Tuesday – with the Democrat winning by a single vote – creating a rare 50-50 tie between the parties in the […]

We need to stop sacrificing women on the altar of deeply mediocre men (ISBA edition)

(This is not Andrew. I would ask you not to speculate in the comments who S is, this is not a great venue for that.) Kristian Lum just published an essay about her experiences being sexually assaulted at statistics conferences.  You should read the whole thing because it’s important, but there’s a sample paragraph. I […]

Always crashing in the same car

“Hey, remember me?  I’ve been busy working like crazy” – Fever Ray I’m at the Banff International Research Station (BIRS) for the week, which is basically a Canadian version of Disneyland where during coffee breaks a Canadian woman with a rake politely walks around telling elk to “shoo”. The topic of this week’s workshop isn’t […]