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Archive of posts filed under the Political Science category.

“If you are primarily motivated to make money, you . . . certainly don’t want to let people know how confused you are by something, or how shallow your knowledge is in certain areas. You want to project an image of mastery and omniscience.”

A reader writes in: This op-ed made me think of one your recent posts. Money quote: If you are primarily motivated to make money, you just need to get as much information as you need to do your job. You don’t have time for deep dives into abstract matters. You certainly don’t want to let […]

As the boldest experiment in journalism history, you admit you made a mistake

The pre-NYT David Brooks liked to make fun of the NYT. Here’s one from 1997: I’m not sure I’d like to be one of the people featured on the New York Times wedding page, but I know I’d like to be the father of one of them. Imagine how happy Stanley J. Kogan must have […]

Beyond the Valley of the Trolls

In a further discussion of the discussion about the discussion of a paper in Administrative Science Quarterly, Thomas Basbøll writes: I [Basbøll] feel “entitled”, if that’s the right word (actually, I’d say I feel privileged), to express my opinions to anyone who wants to listen, and while I think it does say something about an […]

Is a steal really worth 9 points?

Theodore Vasiloudis writes: I’d like to bring your attention to this article by Benjamin Morris discussing the value of steals for the NBA. The author argues that a steal should be a highly sought after statistic as it equates to higher chances of victory and is very hard to replace when a player is injured. […]

Empirical implications of Empirical Implications of Theoretical Models

Robert Bloomfield writes: Most of the people in my field (accounting, which is basically applied economics and finance, leavened with psychology and organizational behavior) use ‘positive research methods’, which are typically described as coming to the data with a predefined theory, and using hypothesis testing to accept or reject the theory’s predictions. But a substantial […]

Teaching Bayesian applied statistics to graduate students in political science, sociology, public health, education, economics, . . .

One of the most satisfying experiences for an academic is when someone asks a question that you’ve already answered. This happened in the comments today. Daniel Gotthardt wrote: So for applied stat courses like for sociologists, political scientists, psychologists and maybe also for economics, what do we actually want to accomplish with our intro courses? […]

How Americans vote

An interview with me from 2012: You’re a statistician and wrote a book, Red State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State, looking at why Americans vote the way they do. In an election year I think it would be a good time to revisit that question, not just for people in the US, but anyone around […]

Preregistration: what’s in it for you?

Chris Chambers pointed me to a blog by someone called Neuroskeptic who suggested that I preregister my political science studies: So when Andrew Gelman (let’s say) is going to start using a new approach, he goes on Twitter, or on his blog, and posts a bare-bones summary of what he’s going to do. Then he […]

“We are moving from an era of private data and public analyses to one of public data and private analyses. Just as we have learned to be cautious about data that are missing, we may have to be cautious about missing analyses also.”

Stephen Senn writes: For many years now I [Senn] have been making the point that obtaining a license to market a drug should carry with it the obligation to share the results with interested parties. . . . Amongst those misunderstanding the issues, are many who work in the pharmaceutical industry. A common assumption is […]

Combining two of my interests

Paul Alper writes: Hi Andrew (or Andy or even Gelman [17 of them]): Go to this link and have some fun with (useless? powerful?) data mining. As the authors say, it is addictive. Paul (no other way to spell it) Alper [215 of us] I’m reminded of this discussion from 2012, “Michael’s a Republican, Susan’s […]