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Archive of posts filed under the Stan category.

Introducing StataStan

Thanks to Robert Grant, we now have a Stata interface! For more details, see: Robert Grant’s Blog:   Introducing StataStan Jonah and Ben have already kicked the tires, and it works. We’ll be working on it more as time goes on as part of our Institute of Education Sciences grant (turns out education researchers use […]

Stan

Logo design by Michael Betancourt and Stephanie Mannheim. P.S. Some commenters suggested the top of the S above is too large, but I wonder if that’s just because I’ve posted the logo in a large format. On the screen it would typically be smaller, something like this, which appears a bit more tasteful:

Stan workshops at UCLA (6/23) and UCI (6/24)

While Bob travels to Boston-ish, I’ll be giving two Stan workshops in Southern California. I’m excited to be back on the west coast for a few days — I grew up not too far away. Both workshops are open, but space is limited. Follow the links for registration. UCLA Social Statistics Seminar Series, 6/23, 10 […]

How tall is Kit Harrington? Stan wants to know.

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming for a special announcement. Madeleine Davies writes: “Here are some photos of Kit Harington. Do you know how tall he is?” I’m reminded, of course, of our discussion of the height of professional tall person Jon Lee Anderson: Full Bayes, please. I can’t promise publication on Gawker, but I’ll […]

JuliaCon 2015 (24–27 June, Boston-ish)

JuliaCon is coming to Cambridge, MA the geek capital of the East Coast: 24–27 June. Here’s the conference site with program. I (Bob) will be giving a 10 minute “lightning talk” on Stan.jl, the Julia interface to Stan (built by Rob J. Goedman — I’m just pinch hitting because Rob couldn’t make it). The uptake […]

Applied regression and multilevel modeling books using Stan

Edo Navot writes: Are there any plans in the works to update your book with Prof. Hill on hierarchical models to a new edition with example code in Stan? Yes, we are planning to break it up into 2 books and do all the modeling for both books in Stan. It’s waiting on some new […]

Bob Carpenter’s favorite books on GUI design and programming

Bob writes: I would highly recommend two books that changed the way I thought about GUI design (though I’ve read a lot of them): * Jeff Johnson. GUI Bloopers. I read the first edition in book form and the second in draft form (the editor contacted me based on my enthusiastic Amazon feedback, which was […]

New Book: Bayesian Data Analysis in Ecology Using Linear Models with R, BUGS, and Stan

Fränzi and Tobias‘s book is now real: Fränzi Korner-Nievergelt, Tobias Roth, Stefanie von Felten, Jérôme Guélat, Bettina Almasi, and Pius Korner-Nievergelt (2015) Bayesian Data Analysis in Ecology Using Linear Models with R, BUGS, and Stan. Academic Press. This is based in part on the in-person tutorials that they and the other authors have been giving […]

Item-response and ideal point models

To continue from today’s class, here’s what we’ll be discussing next time: – Estimating the direction and the magnitude of the discrimination parameters. – How to tell when your data don’t fit the model. – When does ideal-point modeling make a difference? Comparing ideal-point estimates to simple averages of survey responses. P.S. Unlike the previous […]

A silly little error, of the sort that I make every day

Ummmm, running Stan, testing out a new method we have that applies EP-like ideas to perform inference with aggregate data—it’s really cool, I’ll post more on it once we’ve tried everything out and have a paper that’s in better shape—anyway, I’m starting with a normal example, a varying-intercept, varying-slope model where the intercepts have population […]