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Archive of posts filed under the Teaching category.

I’m Niall Ferguson without the money

image Somehow I agreed or volunteered to give 6 talks on different topics to different audiences during a two-week period. Maybe I need to use Google calendar with some sort of spacing feature. Giving talks is fun, and it’s a public service, but this is ridiculous.

Improv

I like this new thing of lecturing improv. I feel that it helps the audience stay focused, as they have to keep the structure of the talk in their heads while it’s happening. Also it enforces more logic in my own presentation, as I’m continually looping back to remind myself and the audience how each […]

He wants to know what book to read to learn statistics

Tim Gilmour writes: I’m an early 40s guy in Los Angeles, and I’m sort of sending myself back to school, specifically in statistics — not taking classes, just working through things on my own. Though I haven’t really used math much since undergrad, a number of my personal interests (primarily epistemology) would be much better […]

ComSciCon: Science Communication Workshop for Graduate Students

Nathan Sanders writes:

Aaron Kaufman reviews Luke Heaton’s “A Brief History of Mathematical Thought”

I got this book in the mail. It looked cool but I didn’t feel I had time to read it. A few decades ago I read this wonderful book by Morris Kline, “Mathematics: The Loss of Certainty,” so I figured I’d have a sense of what most of Heaton’s new book would cover. I would’ve […]

Long Shot

Frank Harrell doesn’t like p-values: In my [Frank’s] opinion, null hypothesis testing and p-values have done significant harm to science. The purpose of this note is to catalog the many problems caused by p-values. As readers post new problems in their comments, more will be incorporated into the list, so this is a work in […]

We fiddle while Rome burns: p-value edition

Raghu Parthasarathy presents a wonderfully clear example of disastrous p-value-based reasoning that he saw in a conference presentation. Here’s Raghu: Consider, for example, some tumorous cells that we can treat with drugs 1 and 2, either alone or in combination. We can make measurements of growth under our various drug treatment conditions. Suppose our measurements […]

Two unrelated topics in one post: (1) Teaching useful algebra classes, and (2) doing more careful psychological measurements

Kevin Lewis and Paul Alper send me so much material, I think they need their own blogs. In the meantime, I keep posting the stuff they send me, as part of my desperate effort to empty my inbox. 1. From Lewis: “Should Students Assessed as Needing Remedial Mathematics Take College-Level Quantitative Courses Instead? A Randomized […]

Hark, hark! the p-value at heaven’s gate sings

Three different people pointed me to this post, in which food researcher and business school professor Brian Wansink advises Ph.D. students to “never say no”: When a research idea comes up, check it out, put some time into it and you might get some success. I like that advice and I agree with it. Or, […]

Avoiding only the shadow knowing the motivating problem of a post.

Given I am starting to make some posts to this blog (again) I was pleased to run across a youtube of Xiao-Li Meng being interviewed on the same topic by Suzanne Smith the Director of the Center for Writing and Communicating Ideas. One thing I picked up was to make the problem being addressed in […]

“Dear Major Textbook Publisher”: A Rant

Dear Major Academic Publisher, You just sent me, unsolicited, an introductory statistics textbook that is 800 pages and weighs about 5 pounds. It’s the 3rd edition of a book by someone I’ve never heard of. That’s fine—a newcomer can write a good book. The real problem is that the book is crap. It’s just the […]

Stan Webinar, Stan Classes, and StanCon

This post is by Eric. We have a number of Stan related events in the pipeline. On 22 Nov, Ben Goodrich and I will be holding a free webinar called Introduction to Bayesian Computation Using the rstanarm R Package. Here is the abstract: The goal of the rstanarm package is to make it easier to use Bayesian […]

Goucher College is looking for a founding director of their Quantitative Reasoning Center

Mileah Kromer writes: We are currently searching for a founding Director of the Quantitative Reasoning Center. Goucher is a small liberal arts college and we are trying to make data analytics and quant reasoning a larger part of our core curriculum. The academic discipline of the center is open. While its advertised as mathematics education […]

3 secrets to giving a remote lecture!

Someone writes in: I noticed that you did a remote lecture in Warwick and I—thinking of organizing such a lecture—was wondering about the logistics. (1) What software did you use? Was any special IT required for it to run? (2) Did you feel that it was a positive speaking experience? Were there any challenges, especially […]

How not to analyze noisy data: A case study

I was reading Jenny Davidson’s blog and came upon this note on an autobiography of the eccentric (but aren’t we all?) biologist Robert Trivers. This motivated me, not to read Trivers’s book, but to do some googling which led me to this paper from Plos-One, “Revisiting a sample of U.S. billionaires: How sample selection and […]

He wants to get started on Bayes

Mathew Mercuri writes: I am interested in learning how to work in a Bayesian world. I have training in a frequentist approach, specifically from an applied health scientist/epidemiologist approach. However, while i teach courses in applied statistics, I am not particularly savvy with heavy statistical mathematics, so I am a bit worried bout how to […]

Free workshop on Stan for pharmacometrics (Paris, 22 September 2016); preceded by (non-free) three day course on Stan for pharmacometrics

So much for one post a day… Workshop: Stan for Pharmacometrics Day If you are interested in a free day of Stan for pharmacometrics in Paris on 22 September 2016, see the registration page: Stan for Pharmacometrics Day (free workshop) Julie Bertrand (statistical pharmacologist from Paris-Diderot and UCL) has finalized the program: When Who What […]

Stan Course up North (Anchorage, Alaska) 23–24 Aug 2016

Daniel Lee’s heading up to Anchorage, Alaska to teach a two-day Stan course at the Alaska chapter of the American Statistical Association (ASA) meeting in Anchorage. Here’s the rundown: Information and Free Registration I hear Alaska’s beautiful in the summer—16 hour days in August and high temps of 17 degrees celsius. Plus Stan! More Upcoming […]

DrawMyData

Robert Grant writes: This web page is something I constructed recently. You might find it useful for making artificial datasets that demonstrate a particular point for students. At any rate, if you have any feedback on it I’d be interested to hear it. I’ve tried to keep it as simple as possible but in due […]

Bayesian Inference with Stan for Pharmacometrics Class

Bob Carpenter, Daniel Lee, and Michael Betancourt will be teaching the 3-day class starting on 19 September in Paris. Following is the outline for the course: Day 1 Introduction to Bayesian statistics Likelihood / sampling distributions Priors, Posteriors via Bayes’s rule Posterior expectations and quantiles Events as expectations of indicator functions Introduction to Stan Basic […]