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The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different communities

Commenters on this blog sometimes tell me not to waste so much time talking about plagiarism. And in the grand scheme of things, what could be more trivial than plagiarism in an obscure German book of chess anecdotes? Yet this is what I have come to talk with you about today. As usual, I will […]

On deck this week

Mon: The plagiarist next door strikes back: Different standards of plagiarism in different communities Tues: Pro Publica’s new Surgeon Scorecards Wed: How Hamiltonian Monte Carlo works Thurs: When does Bayes do the job? Fri: Here’s a theoretical research project for you Sat: Classifying causes of death using “verbal autopsies” Sun: All hail Lord Spiegelhalter!

Spam!

The following bit of irrelevance appeared on the stan-users mailing list: On Jun 11, 2015, at 11:29 AM, Joanna Caldwell wrote: Webinar: Tips & Tricks to Improve Your Logistic Regression . . . Registration Link: . . . Abstract: Logistic regression is a commonly used tool to analyze binary classification problems. However, logistic regression still […]

Statistical/methodological prep for a career in neuroscience research?

Shea Levy writes: I’m currently a software developer, but I’m trying to transition to the neuroscience research world. Do you have any general advice or recommended resources to prepare me to perform sound and useful experimental design and analyses? I have a very basic stats background from undergrad plus eclectic bits and pieces I’ve picked […]

If you leave your datasets sitting out on the counter, they get moldy

I received the following in the email: I had a look at the dataset on speed dating you put online, and I found some big inconsistencies. Since a lot of people are using it, I hope this can help to fix them (or hopefully I did a mistake in interpreting the dataset). Here are the […]

This sentence by Thomas Mallon would make Barry N. Malzberg spin in his grave, except that he’s still alive so it would just make him spin in his retirement

Don’t get me wrong, I think Thomas Mallon is great. But what was he thinking when he wrote this: I know the New Yorker doesn’t do fact-checking anymore, but still. The funny thing is, Malzberg has similarities with Mailer both in style and subject matter. I’m guessing that in his statement Mallon is trying to […]

“Women Respond to Nobel Laureate’s ‘Trouble With Girls'”

Someone pointed me to this amusing/horrifying story of a clueless oldster. Some people are horrified by what the old guy said, other people are horrified by how he was treated. He was clueless in his views about women in science, or he was cluelessly naive about gotcha journalism. I haven’t been following the details and […]

What’s the stupidest thing the NYC Department of Education and Columbia University Teachers College did in the past decade?

Ummm, how bout this: The principal of a popular elementary school in Harlem acknowledged that she forged answers on students’ state English exams in April because the students had not finished the tests . . . As a result of the cheating, the city invalidated several dozen English test results for the school’s third grade. […]

“We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)”

Someone pointed me to this discussion by Lior Pachter of a controversial claim in biology. The statistics The statistical content has to do with a biology paper by M. Kellis, B. W. Birren, and E.S. Lander from 2004 that contains the following passage: Strikingly, 95% of cases of accelerated evolution involve only one member of […]

Ripped from the pages of a George Pelecanos novel

Did anyone else notice that this DC multiple-murder case seems just like a Pelecanos story? Check out the latest headline, “D.C. Mansion Murder Suspect Is Innocent Because He Hates Pizza, Lawyer Says”: Robin Flicker, a lawyer who has represented suspect Wint in the past but has not been officially hired as his defense attorney, says […]

On deck this week

Mon: Ripped from the pages of a George Pelecanos novel Tues: “We can keep debating this after 11 years, but I’m sure we all have much more pressing things to do (grants? papers? family time? attacking 11-year-old papers by former classmates? guitar practice?)” Wed: What do I say when I don’t have much to say? […]

The 3 Stages of Busy

Last week I ran into a younger colleague who said he had a conference deadline that week and could we get together next week, maybe? So I contacted him on the weekend and asked if he was free. He responded: This week quickly got booked after last week’s NIPS deadline. So we’re meeting in another […]

Ira Glass asks. We answer.

The celebrated radio quiz show star says: There’s this study done by the Pew Research Center and Smithsonian Magazine . . . they called up one thousand and one Americans. I do not understand why it is a thousand and one rather than just a thousand. Maybe a thousand and one just seemed sexier or […]

45 years ago in the sister blog

More gremlins: “Instead, he simply pretended the other two estimates did not exist. That is inexcusable.”

Brandon Shollenberger writes: I’ve spent some time examining the work done by Richard Tol which was used in the latest IPCC report.  I was troubled enough by his work I even submitted a formal complaint with the IPCC nearly two months ago (I’ve not heard back from them thus far).  It expressed some of the same concerns […]

BREAKING . . . Kit Harrington’s height

Rasmus “ticket to” Bååth writes: I heeded your call to construct a Stan model of the height of Kit “Snow” Harrington. The response on Gawker has been poor, unfortunately, but here it is, anyway. Yeah, I think the people at Gawker have bigger things to worry about this week. . . . Here’s Rasmus’s inference […]

A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program

As D.M.C. would say, bad meaning bad not bad meaning good. Deborah Mayo points to this terrible, terrible definition of statistical significance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Statistical Significance Definition: A mathematical technique to measure whether the results of a study are likely to be true. Statistical significance is calculated as the […]

Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement

I followed a link at Steve Hsu’s blog and came to this discussion of Feyman’s cognitive style. Hsu writes that “it was often easier for [Feynman] to invent his own solution than to read through someone else’s lengthy paper” and he follows up with a story in which “Feynman did not understand the conventional formulation […]

On deck this week

Mon: Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement Tues: A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program Wed: Ta-Nehisi Coates, David Brooks, and the “street code” of journalism Thurs: Flamebait: “Mathiness” in economics and political science Fri: 45 years ago in the sister blog […]

On deck for the rest of the summer and beginning of fall

Here’s some summer reading for you. The schedule may change because of the insertion of topical material, but this is the basic plan: Richard Feynman and the tyranny of measurement A bad definition of statistical significance from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Effective Health Care Program Ta-Nehisi Coates, David Brooks, and the […]